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/u/

Get detailed PDF on /u/

Work on French Pronunciation

Click on the audio below and repeat this sound: /u/

  • Tu as vu qu’il a plu dans la rue ? - J’ai vu qu’il a plu dans la rue.

................. Did you see that it rained on the street? I saw that it rained on the street

Pronunciation of /ou/

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French sound /ou/

French sound /ou/

french_augustHow to pronounce the French sound /ou/? What does it sound like?

Work on French Pronunciation

Click on the audio below and repeat this sound: /ou/

  • Vous louez toujours en août ?

................. Are you still renting in August?

  • Oui, c’est fou. Je loue toujours en août.

................. Yes, it’s crazy. I’m still renting in August.

Related: Pronunciation of /u/ .

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Manuel

amener emmener apporter emporter

amener emmener apporter emporter

to bring and to take

frenchetc.org

Je t’amène un café ?

I know, I know, this is really difficult to remember. However, don’t sweat it. French people tend to use them interchangeably in many case. amener is a favorite. Yet, if you are as picky as I am, you’ll want to know how it works. Here it is.

to bring

to take

along

amener

emmener

over/away

apporter

emporter

Practice

To practice in a sentence, hide either one of the two languages, and translate into the other language. French to English is easier than English to French.

Easier: translate into English

1.J’emmène/amène Henri chez toi et on pourra travailler.

2.Il apportera/amènera son déjeuner à la réunion.

Or, more challenging: translate into French

 1.I’m taking Henri to your place and we’ll be able to work.

2.He’ll bring his lunch to the meeting.

Continue in the Premium worksheet with more rules and practice.

Related: About CHEZ . Vidéo “J’t’emmène au vent .

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About French

Verbs that take the preposition À

French, French vocabulary, French grammar, French culture, about France, about French, français, vocabulaire, learn French, French podcasts, learn French by podcast, French language podcasts, French tutorial, French one on one, French expressions, expressions, e-learning, learning French, French online, France, listening comprehension, dictées, French dictation, frenchetc.org

Le Solex ressemble à un vélo.

Here is a list of the 10 common verbs that require the preposition À

  1. demander à -- to ask
  2. dire à -- to say to, to tell
  3. donner à -- to give to
  4. écrire à -- to write to
  5. offrir à -- to offer
  6. parler à -- to talk to
  7. prêter à -- to lend to
  8. répondre à -- to answer
  9. ressembler à -- to look like
  10. téléphoner à -- to call

I get into a lot more detail in the Premium worksheet

Verbs that take the preposition À (to or from) are important to know because they

  • stay invariable (masculine and singular) when reflexive in compound tenses[1]
    • Elles se sont parlé. They talked to each other.
      • There is no agreement with pronoun se=elles because PARLER originally takes À (the infinitive form is ‘parler à‘)
  • take LUI and LEUR as pronouns when referring to a person
    • Elle lui a parlé (à Fabienne). She talked to her.
      • HER (fem. in English) is LUI (masc. in French) because PARLER originally takes À (the infinitive form is ‘parler à‘

[1] compounds tenses all have a past participle. The most important compound tenses are le passé composé, le plus-que-parfait, le futur antérieur and le conditionnel passé.

 

Related: French verbs and their prepositions . Verbs with the preposition DE .

About Paris

Love in Paris

Ça te dit, Paris ?

How about Paris?

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Cuisine

Crêpe Recipe

Crêpe Recipe

frenchetc.org

crepe

A French recipe, through the eyes of a native

What's the crepe recipe? How easy is it to make French crepes?

About Anne's crêpes

I don’t put any sugar in my crêpe recipe. That allows me to use the leftover batter for savory crêpes, stuffed with cheese, ham, veggies, whatever is getting oldish in my fridge. For sweet crêpes, I make a whole batch at once, and I sprinkle sugar over each crepe when it is finished. It melts on the hot crepe and become kind of a syrup. Miam miam… delicious !

Preparation

  • Get ½ stick of butter to room temperature to butter the crepe pan
  • It’s best to do the batter at least an hour before. It takes about 5 minutes to make the batter
  • Cooking time: 3 minutes per crepe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of flour
  • 2 large or 3 small eggs
  • 2 cups of milk
  • a spoonful of vegetable oil (NOT olive oil)
  • a pinch of salt

Utensils

  • a mixing bowl
  • a whip or wooden spoon
  • a crepe pan or a saute pan that has a coated surface
  • a ladle to scoop the batter into the crepe pan
  • a cloth with butter to butter the crepe pan before each crepe

Recipe

Mix flour and salt. Add eggs and then milk. The batter must be pretty liquid. Let sit for an hour or over night.

Heat your pan. Butter the crepe pan. You know the pan is at the right temperature if the butter froths. Pour about 1/8 cup of batter – it depends on your pan size and on your taste in crêpes – in the pan. Turn your pan so the batter covers the whole pan. Let it cook for 1 or 2 minutes. Shake it off the bottom of the pan, and flip it. At first, you might want to use your 2 hands and work up to the flipping part later.

Bon Appétit !

Related: Chandeleur Tradition - Other Recipes - la chandeleur

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